Organic Matter

If you’ve ever looked into gardening or if you’re already into gardening and you keep up on gardening literature, I’m sure you’ve heard volumes of discussion with respect to organic matter. It seems like you can never escape the topic: organic matter this, organic matter that. Well, there’s actually good reason for that. Having lots…

Green Composts

Green composts – Examples of green manure include freshly clipped grass clippings from the lawn, green leaves, stems or other green plant anatomy, kitchen scraps, etc. Unlike brown composts, green composts are not as nitrogen-poor and therefore do not run into the same decomposition problems that brown composts have. Keep in mind that green composts…

Brown Composts

Brown composts are older dead plant material. Examples of this would include straw, old leaves, sawdust, branch or twig pieces, old grass clippings, old stalks or stems, wood chips or shavings, etc. The main point is that brown composts are older composts. Aged, or older composts, have unique properties that need to be addressed so…

Green Manure as a Source of Organic Matter

We all know what a brown manure is, but what is a green manure? Green manures come from plants, in fact, green manure is the plants themselves after they’ve been plowed or tilled back into the soil. That’s right, a green manure is nothing more than a bunch of plants that are grown in the…

Brown Manure as a Source of Organic Matter

There are two types of manures: brown and green. Brown manures, the manure we’re all more familiar with, come from animals, green manures come from plants (the result of covercropping). Brown manures, or animal wastes, are a great organic matter source but it does have some interesting characteristics that ought to be understood before using…